Rear End Accident Injuries in Massachusetts

According to data collected by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), approximately 28% of crashes are rear-end collisions.

In many instances, distracted driving is the cause of these collisions with many drivers failing to pay proper attention to the traffic conditions ahead of them. Distracted driving can result from many things including:

  • Texting while driving
  • Using smart phones
  • Using the radio
  • Reading while driving
  • Applying makeup or eating while driving

In 2014 alone, approximately 3,179 people were killed and another 431,000 were injured in auto accidents and collisions, involving some form of distracted driving.

The increased use of technology including smart phones and other hand held devices is likely to continue to be a major cause of distracted driving, leading to accidents on the roadways.

Various studies have shown that it takes up to five seconds to look at a text while driving. During that time, a car traveling at 55 MPH will have traveled the length of a football field without the driver seeing the road! Considering that the average midsize vehicle weighs up to 4,366 pounds, it is easy to see why these accidents can be so dangerous.

As many of us learned in science class, when two objects collide, the momentum of those objects changes, with the vehicle being struck experiencing a sudden increase in its momentum (known as “reaction force”) while the vehicle causing the collision experiences a decrease of momentum. During this sudden absorption of energy, vehicles become deformed and crushed while the energy continues to travel through the vehicle including the occupants.

Injuries from rear-end collisions can be severe and may include:

  • Head injuries and concussions
  • Spinal injuries including herniated discs
  • Broken bones or torn ligaments
  • Emotional distress or PTSD

Although many insurance companies will go to great lengths to try and minimize the effect that a “low speed” or “low impact” will have on a vehicle’s occupant, this argument has largely been excluded in courtrooms across the country as it based on unreliable science and often fails to take into account numerous factors such as the health and condition of the occupants prior to the collision, the positioning of the occupants at the time of the collision and other factors.

If you or loved one has been injured in a rear-end accident, you may be able to recover monetary damages including damages for medical expenses, pain and suffering and lost wages and even loss of future earnings.

Steps to Take After a Car Accident

Following an accident, it is important to document the accident by reporting it to police so that they can make a record including the time and place of the collision. If you suspect that the driver was distracted or impaired, you should make the responding officer aware as well so that proper steps can be taken to identify how that may have played a role in the collision. It is also helpful to take pictures of the damage caused by the collision. Take pictures of the location to document stop signs, landmarks and even the positioning of the vehicles. If there are any witnesses to the collision, it is important to get the witnesses name and contact information including a good cell phone number and email address in the event a statement is needed in the future.

You should also contact an experienced Massachusetts car accident lawyer to discuss your legal options.

The attorneys at Curran & Desharnais, P.C. hope for your safety, however, if you find yourself in a situation where you require legal representation, contact us. We provide experienced representation for people who have been injured in car accidents throughout Massachusetts & the Boston area.

Call the Boston auto accident Attorneys at Curran & Desharnais, P.C. Today at 781-277-3262 or email Attorney Curran directly at jkcurran@verizon.net to discuss your claim or set up a meeting.

For more resources and statistics for distracted driving click the link below:

http://www.distraction.gov/stats-research-laws/facts-and-statistics.html